Dolce inganno greco (Italian Edition)

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Indeed, during the 29 years he spent in London, Rolli geared the majority of his work as an editor, poet, librettist, and translator either toward his own expatriate community or existing English admirers of Italian, who had often acted as his patrons. Here, too, Rolli capitalized on an existing admiration for Italian culture, especially the Italian opera, in his adopted country, composing libretti for the Royal Academy throughout the s. Throughout the s and early s, too, while paying his way with opera, Rolli was hard at work on a translation of Paradise Lost , the first six books of which would be published in London in , and the whole epic in Aimed, of necessity, at Italian readers, and widely published in Italy after its completion, Del Paradiso Perduto combines the expatriate Rolli's fascination for English literature, particularly Milton, with his great pride in the Italian language—especially when, par distance , he saw or sensed it was under attack.

In this work, published in , aimed at English readers in his adopted country, Voltaire pronounces upon the literary and linguistic character of several European countries. In his opinion, It is as easy to distinguish a Spanish , an Italian , or an English Author, by their Stile, as to know by their Gate, their Speech, and their Features, in what Country they were born[. As a French writer resident in England, Voltaire has most praise for both his native and his adopted languages, and rather less for Italian and Spanish; he remarks upon [t]he Italian Softness, their Witticism, so often degenerating into Conceit, the pompous and metaphorical Stile of the Spaniard , the Exactness and Perspicuity of the French , the Strength peculiar to the English …[.

Even when Voltaire does admire an Italian author, as with Tasso, he seems able to praise him only at arm's length, while denigrating the present state of the Italian peninsula and its language: Time, which undermines the Reputation of indifferent Authors, hath stamp'd the Character of Immortality upon [Tasso's] Works.

Such faint praise at least suggests that Italian literature and the Italian taste were at a peak of excellence during the Renaissance, even if they have since degenerated. But even in this opinion, Voltaire is not consistent, writing, When [Tasso] enters into descriptions which require Strength and Majesty, it is wonderful how the natural Effeminacy of the Italian Language soars up into Sublimity and Grandeur, and assumes a new Character in his Hands, if we except about an hundred Lines in which he flattens into pitiful Conceits, but I look on these Errors as a kind of Tribute, which his Genius condescended to pay to the Italian Taste.


  1. Table of contents.
  2. Shelley’s Italian Experience | SpringerLink.
  3. ?
  4. Editions of Beauty and the Greek by Kim Lawrence.
  5. The Lectionary Lab Commentary with Stories and Sermons for Year A.

Voltaire's Essay , published in , he objects to the suggestion that the poetic style of different nations could be qualitatively assessed. I always thought that the Country of an Author was to be discovered by his Language, or what he related of his Age, Country or himself….

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There is a Degree of Perfection and Taste, which when Authors and Criticks are arriv'd at, make them all of one Nation, call'd the Commonwealth of Letters. Despite Rolli's energetic call for literary parity between nations, he still proceeds to make a special plea for his language, rather than Voltaire's, as the best; and, revealingly, he mounts this defense on the basis of which language makes the fitter, more faithful medium for rendering Paradise Lost 4.

This was before Rolli's translation of the epic had been published, but, to judge by his anecdote here, at least part of it was already circulating. He writes, When I was in France I was acquainted with some learned Frenchmen that understood English , and had read Milton's Paradise Lost , and they admired that Battle [of the angels] as a prodigious fine Poetical Description.

One of them whose Name I don't remember, who was a great Friend to the Noble and learned Venetian Abbate Conti , had undertaken to translate the Poem; and when he read the two first Books translated by me, he said that the Italian language was the fittest for it, and that the French cou'd never make so literal a Translation, for some Reasons he alleged, the Principal of which was the Want of Blank Verse, which by the Bye was first invented by Italian Poets.

Voltaire , when he shall see the Italian Softness and Effeminacy soar to Sublimity, and grow when required, as strong and as majestick as the Language of Milton. Here, Rolli is using Paradise Lost as a touchstone for poetic excellence—so that if a language is good for translating the epic, that is an endorsement of the language in itself. In part, this is a sop to Rolli's English audience, whose approval he is trying to win.

A milestone in Italian criticism of Milton, Rolli's preface to Del Paradiso Perduto is an important indicator of many of the beliefs about language, poetry, and literary translation that also animate his adaptation of A Maske. A version published in Verona in also included an Italian translation of Rolli's response to Voltaire.

He imitated Petrarch both in the style and the meter of his English sonnets, and he translated the second Psalm into his own language in tercets using the Dantean meter. Although Rolli overstates the extent to which Milton imitated, rather than assimilated and transmuted, Italian poetry in his own, we might still recognize his consciousness of an aspect of early Milton that arguably even now is inadequately registered. It seems particularly notable, in the context of a work aimed at impressing upon Italian readers the peculiar impact of their own language and literary history on a famous English author, that Rolli chooses this occasion to suggest that English critics have not always been as astute as they might be to Milton's Italian influences.

Il Verso avrebbe ritenuta la medesima se non maggior forza, in tal maniera cangiato. The line would have kept the same, if not greater force, altered in such a way. Che astruso Enigma!

Shelley’s Italian Experience

Dorris In consequence, I cut a miserable figure. What an abstruse enigma! Rolli wrote Sabrina for the Opera of the Nobility, the breakaway group he and other Italian rebels had founded in , in opposition to Handel and his Royal Academy of Music. The music has been lost, but Rolli's libretto for Sabrina was published in London the year of its production.

The book does not say anything about its own bilingualism or the identity of the translator, still less mention whether the same person translated Rolli's prose prefazione and his verse libretto. This would suggest that the bilingual Rolli, as elsewhere, was his own translator, so to speak, and composed both halves of the volume. As an unattributed note on the British Library's copy of Sabrina points out, the frontispiece reproduced below makes no mention of the opera's composer. Egerton , The Lady Alice Egerton. The Musick was composed by Mr. Dalton 1. Image reproduced from Eighteenth Century Collections Online.

At the surface level, many of Rolli's alterations operate to bring the work, rather dully, into line with neoclassical dramatic conventions. If the tide was already turning against the Opera of the Nobility, maybe Sabrina could not have done much to save it; but Rolli's preface to the published version of his work is still keen to aggrandize his production by associating it with the illustrious provenance of the original.

The rest of the preface describes in detail the circumstances under which A Maske was first performed, and the nobility of the Egerton family, which, Rolli emphasizes, has only increased in the years since it was first written 2. She asks Tirsi simply to trust that his lord will not be harmed.

We next see our four lovers, Grandalma, Belcore, Brunalto, and Crindoro, at the entrance to the forest. Though Rolli's libretto departs from Milton's Maske in more than plot, we can see both the original Italian libretto and the English translation making an effort to be Miltonic, in notably focused ways. This unavoidably suggests Rolli's familiarity with that poem, and therefore, we might reasonably suppose, an acquaintance with the volume as a whole.

Having Comaspe paraphrase Milton's God is one way of illustrating his presumptuousness; his unfounded sense that he cannot be conquered leads to the kind of hubristic downfall that will be Satan's too.

References

Here, Rolli has woven an intricate system of echoes and allusions between his own version of A Maske , his translation of that version, the original Paradise Lost , and his translation of it. He has created an instance of the interdependence between Milton and Italian that he elsewhere seeks to prove. I would suggest that, understand it or not, Rolli takes the occasion of this adaptation to reach back into some of the glories of Italian literature, as he and his fellow Arcadians saw them; and to reinforce the capabilities of the Italian language, by then so often deprecated, by means of its fitness for translating the work of Milton, whose excellence was not in doubt.

Rolli is able to make the changes he does to the Maske because of its relative obscurity and its cerebral plot, short on action of the usual kind. The masque's penumbral impersonality is a canvas onto which Rolli can retroject some of the themes and preoccupations of the poetry he and his Arcadian colleagues most admire. Beyond explicitly Tassonian echoes, there are also moments when Rolli makes reference to Milton's other Italian touchstones, giving them a Neoplatonic polish.

Greco-Italian War Part 1: The Invasion

For instance, in scene 3 of Sabrina , when Comaspe makes his first appearance having briefly been alluded to in the opera's opening lines , he speaks in the voice of a hopeful lover: A sperare or cominicio il dolce il vero. Up until this day, I, a demigod and son of Circe, have searched in vain for the ultimate beauty to appease my desires. This double nostalgia, for the cinquecento in the first instance and the golden age of Augustus in the second, mediates and, as it were, ironizes the nostalgic project of the Arcadians.

In Rolli's case, this mediated quality creates work that aims for Arcadian authenticity, but becomes caught up in the imitation of cinquecento authors and manners. Where Rolli's adaptation of Milton is concerned, this effect, while apparently unpleasing to Sabrina 's original audience, does much to bring out a side of Milton's early work that had not been much discussed since Milton's own time and not, always, even then : his indebtedness to an Italian, predominantly Tuscan, lyric tradition dating back to Dante and Petrarch, but reanimated and given a newly pastoral cast by Neoplatonic poets in the sixteenth century.

Arguably, scholars have not yet fully mapped out Milton's engagement with the Italian literary models foregrounded by Rolli's adaptation. Older works such as F. Prince's The Italian Element in Milton's Verse , or Irene Samuel's Dante and Milton focus on Milton's stylistic and, as it were, atmospheric borrowings from those Italian poets he is known to have admired. More recently, Patrick Cook has argued for the importance of Tasso's pastoral drama Aminta as an intertext for A Maske , in particular, and for the Poems more generally.

Indeed, during the 29 years he spent in London, Rolli geared the majority of his work as an editor, poet, librettist, and translator either toward his own expatriate community or existing English admirers of Italian, who had often acted as his patrons. Here, too, Rolli capitalized on an existing admiration for Italian culture, especially the Italian opera, in his adopted country, composing libretti for the Royal Academy throughout the s. Throughout the s and early s, too, while paying his way with opera, Rolli was hard at work on a translation of Paradise Lost , the first six books of which would be published in London in , and the whole epic in Aimed, of necessity, at Italian readers, and widely published in Italy after its completion, Del Paradiso Perduto combines the expatriate Rolli's fascination for English literature, particularly Milton, with his great pride in the Italian language—especially when, par distance , he saw or sensed it was under attack.

In this work, published in , aimed at English readers in his adopted country, Voltaire pronounces upon the literary and linguistic character of several European countries. In his opinion, It is as easy to distinguish a Spanish , an Italian , or an English Author, by their Stile, as to know by their Gate, their Speech, and their Features, in what Country they were born[. As a French writer resident in England, Voltaire has most praise for both his native and his adopted languages, and rather less for Italian and Spanish; he remarks upon [t]he Italian Softness, their Witticism, so often degenerating into Conceit, the pompous and metaphorical Stile of the Spaniard , the Exactness and Perspicuity of the French , the Strength peculiar to the English …[.

(PDF) Thomas 97 - 3. pigiggposo.tk | Ben Thomas - pigiggposo.tk

Even when Voltaire does admire an Italian author, as with Tasso, he seems able to praise him only at arm's length, while denigrating the present state of the Italian peninsula and its language: Time, which undermines the Reputation of indifferent Authors, hath stamp'd the Character of Immortality upon [Tasso's] Works. Such faint praise at least suggests that Italian literature and the Italian taste were at a peak of excellence during the Renaissance, even if they have since degenerated.

maisonducalvet.com/ciutadella-del-dating.php But even in this opinion, Voltaire is not consistent, writing, When [Tasso] enters into descriptions which require Strength and Majesty, it is wonderful how the natural Effeminacy of the Italian Language soars up into Sublimity and Grandeur, and assumes a new Character in his Hands, if we except about an hundred Lines in which he flattens into pitiful Conceits, but I look on these Errors as a kind of Tribute, which his Genius condescended to pay to the Italian Taste. Voltaire's Essay , published in , he objects to the suggestion that the poetic style of different nations could be qualitatively assessed.

I always thought that the Country of an Author was to be discovered by his Language, or what he related of his Age, Country or himself…. There is a Degree of Perfection and Taste, which when Authors and Criticks are arriv'd at, make them all of one Nation, call'd the Commonwealth of Letters. Despite Rolli's energetic call for literary parity between nations, he still proceeds to make a special plea for his language, rather than Voltaire's, as the best; and, revealingly, he mounts this defense on the basis of which language makes the fitter, more faithful medium for rendering Paradise Lost 4.

This was before Rolli's translation of the epic had been published, but, to judge by his anecdote here, at least part of it was already circulating. He writes, When I was in France I was acquainted with some learned Frenchmen that understood English , and had read Milton's Paradise Lost , and they admired that Battle [of the angels] as a prodigious fine Poetical Description.

One of them whose Name I don't remember, who was a great Friend to the Noble and learned Venetian Abbate Conti , had undertaken to translate the Poem; and when he read the two first Books translated by me, he said that the Italian language was the fittest for it, and that the French cou'd never make so literal a Translation, for some Reasons he alleged, the Principal of which was the Want of Blank Verse, which by the Bye was first invented by Italian Poets. Voltaire , when he shall see the Italian Softness and Effeminacy soar to Sublimity, and grow when required, as strong and as majestick as the Language of Milton.

Here, Rolli is using Paradise Lost as a touchstone for poetic excellence—so that if a language is good for translating the epic, that is an endorsement of the language in itself. In part, this is a sop to Rolli's English audience, whose approval he is trying to win. A milestone in Italian criticism of Milton, Rolli's preface to Del Paradiso Perduto is an important indicator of many of the beliefs about language, poetry, and literary translation that also animate his adaptation of A Maske.